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Everyone dreamed of them: what things in the USSR were considered a sign of wealth

What things were a sign of wealth in the USSR. Source: freepik.com

Life in the Soviet Union was not easy. Most people lived modestly, unable to afford the things that we take for granted now.

Nevertheless, people still strived for a prosperous life or at least the illusion of wealth and success. OBOZ.UA has compiled a list of things that everyone in the USSR dreamed of, but only a select few could afford.

Scarce goods

Only people from high society could live in luxury and eat high-quality sausages, and cheese, drink elite alcohol, or eat expensive fish. These were, for example, party workers, military officers, intelligence officers, scientists, diplomats, and astronauts.

But the issue was not about money. Ordinary Soviet citizens did not have access to a large number of goods, because they were simply not delivered to ordinary stores.

Everyone dreamed of them: what things in the USSR were considered a sign of wealth

Housing

In the USSR, it was almost impossible to buy or rent housing, but the state did provide it to its citizens for free. However, firstly, not everyone was so lucky, and secondly, the living conditions in such apartments were not the best. Therefore, at a time when many people were living in communal housing, owning their own separate housing was a real dream.

At the same time, privileged citizens could get housing bypassing the queue, and party workers had their own large apartments in Stalinist buildings by default.

A car

Any Soviet citizen could buy a car, but it required standing in endless lines and paying a lot of money. In addition, there were only a few models on the market. People were only offered the Moskvich-400, GAZ-20 Pobeda, and ZIM.

Everyone dreamed of them: what things in the USSR were considered a sign of wealth

Sometimes you could see foreign cars on the streets of the USSR, but they belonged only to foreigners, such as diplomats or journalists.

Furniture and appliances

During the Iron Curtain, foreign goods were considered the best and were on the wish lists of every citizen of the USSR. Furniture and appliances were no exception. Imported walls, carpets, or color TVs immediately made it clear that their owners had high incomes.

Many people saved up for years in pursuit of the desired goods and lined up in stores in advance.

In the 70s, for example, a furniture wall could be purchased for 800 rubles, while a young specialist's salary ranged from 70 to 130 rubles.

Crystal

Soviet housewives were incredibly appreciative of crystal products. However, despite the fact that this material was actively produced in the USSR, people preferred items from Czech Bohemia.

A Bohemian glass chandelier was a special indicator of status and taste.

Everyone dreamed of them: what things in the USSR were considered a sign of wealth

Clothing

In the USSR, it was very easy to distinguish the rich from ordinary people because they dressed atypically. Back then, not everyone could afford to be different. For example, good jeans could only be bought on the black market and at a high markup.

Recreation

Ordinary citizens in the USSR could only dream of traveling abroad, so if someone was lucky enough to go on a business trip, it was a big deal. As a rule, only scientists, engineers, athletes, company executives, and other highly qualified professionals could see the world in this way.

Everyone dreamed of them: what things in the USSR were considered a sign of wealth

At the same time, it was almost impossible to go abroad just to have a vacation.

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